Cultural and Community Centers' Workshops

Cultural and Community Centers (CCC) offers workshops which create supportive spaces for students to engage in meaningful conversations around issues of diversity and inclusion. These workshops are designed for various audiences and can be tailored to fit any group whether it be as an in-classroom presentation or co-curricular experience (i.e., student organization meeting, student leader training, leadership/diversity conference, etc.).

Please see descriptions below of current CCC workshops.

About CCC Workshops

In order to assist you in selecting an appropriate workshop, our workshops are categorized into one of three clusters: affective, cognitive, and behavioral. For more information about each category, as well as a list of associated workshops, please see the information in the section below.

 

 Affective Workshops

Workshops within this category introduce students to the existence of different cultures, as well as some of the factors that impact the perceptions of those cultures, and the concept of intercultural competence. Workshops within this category aim to introduce students to the requisite attitudes when learning about different cultures. Acquiring the requisite attitudes implies a willingness to risk and to move beyond one’s comfort zone.

    • American Dream Game

      Imagine your favorite childhood board games combined with challenging lessons and conversations for a structured-play experience that encourages students to spend time in someone else’s shoes to explore how bias, stereotypes, discrimination, and systemic inequity can block our path toward “The American Dream.”

      • CultureBread Person

        We are not alone in this world (well, on this planet). Understanding one another may prove to be a challenging task, no matter how closely or far we live from each other because of something that is greater than physical distance – culture. Using the models of cultural theorists Milton Bennett and Darla K. Deardorff, our presenters will help you discover a pathway to cross-cultural understanding and introduce you to someone, who will help make meaning of it all – the CultureBread Person!

        • Three People

          Where do our assumptions come from? What is the difference between assumptions and judgments? When do we show “different” parts of ourselves? How does this relate to code switching? Have you ever judged a book by its cover? In this interactive workshop, participants will begin to answer to these questions while exploring the concepts of stereotyping, socialization, and societal norms.

         Cognitive Workshops

        Workshops within this category enhance students’ knowledge of various cultures and sub-cultures. Additionally, these workshops aim to develop skills that address the acquisition and processing of knowledge, and ones that students can utilize in their intercultural competence development.

          • BaFa-BaFa

            In this simulation, participants are assigned to two artificial cultures. Each group is introduced to a different set of cultural values and allowed to practice these values and subsequently engage the other culture. This simulation is designed to foster cross-cultural awareness through experiencing the development and impact of stereotypes. Participants come to appreciate the negative impact of stereotypes and of the need to foster greater tolerance and understanding of others in all spheres of life.

            • Student Safe Space

              This workshop exposes participants to basic concepts of LGBTQ cultural competency, including concepts of language, identity terms, inclusion practices, and campus resources.

              • Salary Negotiation

                Using the lens of the gender pay gap, this presentation is designed to empower college-aged women with the skills and confidence they need to successfully negotiate their salary and benefits. The workshop curriculum utilizes the latest research and negotiation strategies to help women navigate the complexities of job offers and promotion opportunities.

                • One Choice Bystander Intervention Training

                  One Choice invites participants to reassess the role the community has in preventing power-based personal violence (dating/domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking), encourages participants to believe that their contribution matters, and engages participants in education that will expand their knowledge base and skill set to take action.

                 Behavioral Workshops

                Workshops within this category explore intersections of identity, and the contextual presentation of culture in everyday situations. These workshops aim to equip students with the ability to develop an ethnorelative perspective and demonstrate culturally effective and appropriate behaviors and communication styles.

                  • Identity Detective

                    To engage meaningfully with others interculturally, we must first begin to understand who we are. The purpose of this interactive workshop is to enhance participants’ understanding of their personal and social identities and their capacity for continuous self-reflection. This will be an introductory workshop designed for those who are relatively new to conversations about diversity and identity.

                    • Oil and Water

                      At some point in our lives, we’ve all been told “don’t talk about politics in public” and for good reason. It can be really difficult to find common ground with others when political ideology is involved. But developing a political ideology can be just as difficult internally. Many people struggle to align their political ideology with other identities they hold. This presentation will examine the experiences of people whose political ideology don’t align with public expectations and discover how they learned to mix “oil & water.”

                      • Take a Position

                        This workshop encourages students to share their viewpoints and explore how they may be similar or different from others in order to begin to interrogate not only what our opinions are, but also the impact they may have on others and ourselves. Students will be asked to engage with others in respectful dialogue and inquiry to learn more about how viewpoints are formed.

                      Request a CCC Workshop

                      Important Information

                      • We ask that all workshops be requested at least four (4) weeks in advance of the desired presentation date.
                      • You will be contacted by a member of our staff within three (3) business days of your submission to confirm availability of facilitators and to schedule a follow-up meeting to discuss the desired learning outcomes and goals for the presentation.
                      • The requesting organization is asked to provide both the space and technology for presentations.
                      • Each session can be tailored to fit varying time periods; minimum amount of time needed for facilitation is 50-55 minutes.
                      • The general purpose of these workshops is to create interactive spaces to engage in dialogue about social identity and cultural competence. If your organization is seeking mediation, the Office of Student Advocacy (advocacy.kennesaw.edu) can serve as a resource.
                      • The intended audience for CCC workshops are KSU students. If you are seeking a workshop for KSU staff and/or faculty or for an external campus partner, please email us at ccc@kennesaw.edu.

                       

                      SUBMIT YOUR WORKSHOP REQUEST

                       

                       

                       

                       

                      ©